British Colonial Developments, 1774-1834

By Vincent Harlow; Frederick Madden | Go to book overview

with the French Government, or whether its execution shall be left to depend upon the spontaneous adoption by France of that freedom in regard to English vessels, which is a necessary preliminary.

That in the latter case, it might perhaps be sufficient, if the Governor were directed to admit such French ships as would be furnished with a document signed either by His Majesty's Ambassador at Paris or by British Consuls at French ports showing that those ports are open to British ships from the Mauritius upon the same terms as French vessels.

That in the former case it would probably be right to furnish the Governor with some document from the Secretary of State's Office, to show that the two Governments had come to an understanding on the subject.


39
EXTRACT FROM AN EDITORIAL IN THE TIMES 18 June 18191

. . . Our noble station at the Cape of Good Hope has the finest soil and climate in the world; it is in the centre of both hemispheres-it commands the commerce of the globe-it produces in unparalleled abundance all the necessaries and all the luxuries of life, whether civilized or savage. It is the natural key of India, the bridle of America, and is capable of superseding the whole of Europe in supplying this country with her accustomed articles of importation. . . . Make the Cape a free port for the nations of Europe, and we banish North America from the Indian seas: carry out as settlers all the families who have not bread nor labour here, and we lay for posterity another England, with which, by equitable and skilful government, the mother country will be joined in bands indissoluble.


40
CAPE COLONY: THOMAS COURTENAY TO HENRY GOULBURN, 18 August 18192

Cannon Row.

SIR,

I have on former occasions submitted to His Majesty's Government the very strong representations which I have received from the

____________________
1
The Times, 18 June 1819, p. 2. Printed in R.C.C., vol. xii, p. 234. The editor is regretting the westward stream of emigration and welcoming the plan for colonization in South Africa as 'the most precious and magnificent object of our colonial policy'. He declares his conviction that 'for colonisation to become an effectual source of relief to this country, it must be powerfully aided and supported by the state' (contrast pp. 401-3 below).
2
R.C.C., vol. xii, pp. 287-9. Thomas P. Courtenay had succeeded Huskisson as Agent for Cape Colony. From 1812 to 1828 he was also Secretary to the Commissioners for the Affairs of India and from 1828 to 1830 Vice-President of the Board of Trade.

-313-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
British Colonial Developments, 1774-1834
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 622

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.