British Colonial Developments, 1774-1834

By Vincent Harlow; Frederick Madden | Go to book overview

be before it will become of value, as the Indians will not want for suggestions to enhance its price. I consider this country to be of immense value, whether it be regarded in respect to its immediate advantages, the future prospect of advantage, or the probable grounds for supposing that it will remain the most permanent foreign possession of Great Britain. . . .

[To effect these purposes Simcoe suggests that a special corps of troops should be raised, consisting of four companies, each of which would be about 100 strong. Such force could be trained to operate naval vessels on the Great Lakes, and would preserve the security of the infant settlement against American expansion and possible attacks by the Indian tribes.]


4
LOWER CANADA: MINUTE OF THE COMMITTEE FOR TRADE ON IRISH EMIGRATION 11 July 17921

Read letter from Mr. King, transmitting by direction of Mr. Secretary Dundas, extract of a letter from Alured Clarke Esq. Lieut. Governor of the Province of Lower Canada, dated 28th April last, enclosing a Memorial of William Porter on the subject of turning the course of emigration from Ireland to Philadelphia (stated to have amounted annually to 1,500 persons) and to induce such emigrants to settle in the Province of Lower Canada, with a report of the Land Committee to Lieutenant Governor Clarke upon the said Memorial.

Ordered, that a letter be written to Mr. King in answer, observing to him that, in addition to the number above-mentioned (which are said annually to emigrate to Philadelphia) it appears by a letter of Mr. Consul Miller, dated Charlestown the 28th December 1791, and transmitted to him by order of this Committee in a letter dated the 13th of March last, that near 800 persons arrived at the single Port of Charlestown from Larn and Londonderry in the course of last year; and stating that letters from Mr. Consul Bond afford further evidence of the great numbers which annually emigrate to America from His Majesty's European Dominions; and desiring him to acquaint Mr. Secretary Dundas that this Committee, alarmed at the numbers which appear thus to emigrate, are unwilling to recommend the measures suggested in the Papers received from Lieut. Governor Clarke, as they might have the appearance of encouraging still further emigration, though to the British colonies in preference to the countries belonging to the United States; yet that their Lordships are of opinion that it may be advisable to transmit copies of the above- mentioned Papers to the Lord Lieutenant of Ireland for the information of the Government of that Kingdom, so that they may be

____________________
1
B.T. 5/8, pp. 102-4.

-393-

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