British Colonial Developments, 1774-1834

By Vincent Harlow; Frederick Madden | Go to book overview

Whatever we have said above of peasants, or labourers of the earth, applies also to artificers. There are the same means of forcing trade as of forcing natural productions; only remove the burdens, facilitate the operations, and even study the tempers of those who are engaged in the two pursuits. But to make men love a thing, even though that thing be their native land, it is not sufficient to tell them that they ought to love it: no, it must be rendered lovely.


12
R.J. WILMOT HORTON: PAPER AND EVIDENCE SUBMITTED TO A SELECT COMMITTEE OF THE HOUSE OF COMMONS ON THE EMPLOYMENT OF THE POOR IN IRELAND, 2 July 18231

The Government, desirous of alleviating the inconveniences of excessive population in Ireland, and at the same time of giving to the provinces of Canada, an accession of emigrants capable of improving the advantages afforded by those colonies to active and industrious men, has taken into consideration the expediency of providing for the transport and location of a certain number of settlers, on a system which will best ensure their immediate comfort and their future prosperity.

And as it has been found that many persons have of late years, in the hope of bettering their condition, been induced to remove from Ireland, and seek an asylum in a foreign country, suffering many immediate privations from the want of assistance, and having no security for their future comfortable settlement, there can be little doubt that this offer of Government, to convey such as may be willing to emigrate to a colony in which many of their countrymen are happily settled, and when they have the certain prospect of maintaining themselves in comfort, and being useful to the empire, will be gladly embraced.

Although it is probable, that on experience of the good effects of affording these facilities, the Government may be induced to extend the scale in future, it is thought prudent to attempt nothing more this year than can certainly be carried into effect, with a due regard to the comfort of the emigrant, and to public economy in the conduct of the measure; and accordingly it has been ordered that means shall, with as little delay as possible, be provided in the harbour of Cork for

____________________
1
Parl. Papers, 1823 (561), vol. vi, pp. 168-9, 179. Wilmot Horton succeeded Goulburn as Under-Secretary for the Colonies when the latter in December 1821 became Irish Secretary. He believed strongly that colonies were an integral part of Greater Britain and the main remedy for distress at home. He was a member of this Select Committee. This paper and plan were enlargements of a proposal which he had submitted to the Agricultural Committee in 1822.

-403-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
British Colonial Developments, 1774-1834
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 622

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.