British Colonial Developments, 1774-1834

By Vincent Harlow; Frederick Madden | Go to book overview

duty in Canada and Nova Scotia. The officers of Customs at the several ports of the United Kingdom have received the necessary instructions on this subject and public notice will be given should it at any future time be found expedient to vary the course of proceeding now adopted. . . .


20
R. W. HAY TO LIEUTENANT ROBERT LOW 22 May 18341

SIR,

In reply to your letter of the 10th instant, I am directed by Mr. Secretary Stanley to again remind you that, in the absence of all legal power to detain ships, not absolutely infringing on the provisions of the Passengers Act, however objectionable may be the state in which they may be proceeding to sea, it would be desirable for you to confine yourself to remonstrance only with the owners of such ships; as a more violent mode of proceeding tends merely to show the nonexistence of a power to compel offending parties to alter their conduct.

I enclose you the names of the officers who have been appointed Emigration Agents, together with the ports to which they are respectively attached; but as letters to them will not be delivered free of postage, I would suggest the propriety of communicating with them through the medium of this office. . . .


B. CONVICTS AND COLONISTS IN AUSTRALASIA

21
JOSEPH BANKS: EVIDENCE BEFORE A COMMITTEE OF THE HOUSE OF COMMONS ON TRANSPORTATION 1 April 17792

Yoseph Banks, Esquire, being requested, in case it should be thought expedient to establish in a colony of convicted felons in any distant

____________________
1
C.O. 358/8, pp. 16-18. Lieutenant Low, R.N., was appointed Government Emigration Agent in Liverpool in 1833 to enforce the provisions of the Passenger Act, but found his powers inadequate. Even after a further Passenger Act (5 & 6 Will. IV, cap. 53), two of the most notorious Atlantic crossings were made from Liverpool in 1836 by the Kingston and the Celia; and 16 ⅟2 per cent. of emigrants leaving the British Isles died on the North Atlantic passage in the black year of 1847. (See also Parl. Papers, 1851 (198), vol. xl, e.g. evidence of Vere Foster, p. 434.)
2
Journals of the House of Commons, vol. xxxvii, p. 311. Joseph Banks, President of the Royal Society, had accompanied Captain Cook as naturalist on his voyage in 1768-71. This committee was appointed to consider persons convicted of felonies and misdemeanours in prison and problems of their maintenance and employment. John Howard had given evidence the same day.

-426-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
British Colonial Developments, 1774-1834
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 622

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.