British Colonial Developments, 1774-1834

By Vincent Harlow; Frederick Madden | Go to book overview

neighbourhood, the concession is useless; for the Dutch have an agent almost on every island in those seas. If we have a settlement, it is unnecessary; for as spices are the only articles we could expect by it, it is probable we should stand in no need of their indulgence, for as part of New South Wales lies in the same latitude with the Moluccas, and is even very close to them, there is every reason to suppose that what nature has so bountifully bestowed on the small islands may also be found on the larger. But if, contrary to analogy, it should not be so, the defect is easily supplied, for, as the seeds are procured without difficulty, any quantity may speedily be cultivated.

To those who are alarmed at the idea of weakening the mother country by opening a channel for emigration, I must answer that it is more profitable that a part of our countrymen should go to a new abode, where they may be useful to us, than to the American States. If we cannot keep our subjects at home, it is sound policy to point out a road by following of which they may add to the national strength.

The place which New South Wales holds on our globe might give it a very commanding influence in the policy of Europe. If a colony from Britain was established in that large tract of country, and if we were at war with Holland or Spain, we might very powerfully annoy either state from our new settlement. We might, with a safe and expeditious voyage, make naval incursions on Java and the other Dutch settlements; and we might with equal facility invade the coast of Spanish America, and intercept the Manilla ships, laden with the treasures of the west. This check which New South Wales would be in time of war on both those powers makes it a very important object when we view it in the chart of the world with a political eye. . . .


23
SIR GEORGE YOUNG: A PLAN FOR SETTLING NEW SOUTH WALES, January 17851

. . . The American Loyalists would here find a fertile, healthy soil, far preferable to their own, and well worthy their industry, where, with a very small part of the expense the Crown must necessarily be at for their support, they may be established now comfortably, and with a greater prospect of success than in any other place hitherto pointed out for them.

The very heavy expense Government is annually put to for transporting and otherwise punishing the felons, together with the facility

____________________
1
H.R.N.S.W., vol. i, pt. ii, p. 12. Enclosed in R. P. Arden (Attorney-General) to Lord Sydney, 13 January 1785. Admiral Sir George Young had served with the East India Company, and in Canada and in the West Indies. He supported Matra's scheme, suggesting that it might be a solution of the convict, as well as the Loyalist, problem. He was a promoter of the Sierra Leone Company.

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