British Colonial Developments, 1774-1834

By Vincent Harlow; Frederick Madden | Go to book overview

30
ADDITIONAL INSTRUCTIONS TO GOVERNOR PHILLIP CONCERNING LAND GRANTS 20 August 17891

Whereas it has been represented unto Us that assurances were given to the non-commission officers and men belonging to the detachment of Our marine forces serving on the continent of New South Wales that such of the said non-commission officers and men as shall have behaved well shall be allowed to quit Our service on their return to England, or be discharged abroad upon the relief (designed to take place at the expiration of three years after their landing) and be permitted to settle in that country. And whereas it is probable that in consequence of that engagement some of the said non-commission officers and men will be desirous of continuing in that settlement or upon the islands comprised within your government; and as persons of that description will be of great utility in the new settlements, not only for the purposes of protection and defence, but for the cultivation of the land: We have thought it advisable that every reasonable encouragement should be held out to them to induce them to be aiding in such salutary purposes. It is therefore Our royal will and pleasure that you do issue your warrant to the Surveyor-General to survey and allot to such of the non-commission officers and men as shall be disposed to become settlers within your government, on their desiring the same, the proportions of land hereinafter mentioned, subject, however, to the following conditions and regulations:--

To every non-commission officer one hundred acres, and to every private man fifty acres, over and above the quantity directed by Our General Instructions to you to be granted to such convicts as may hereafter be emancipated or discharged from their servitude, free of all fees, taxes, quit rents, and other acknowledgments for the space of ten years; but after the expiration of that time to be liable to an annual quit rent of one shilling for every fifty2 acres. . . .

And whereas from the disposition of many people to emigrate from this country there is a great probability that some of them may be desirous of becoming settlers in New South Wales or the said islands dependent thereupon: it is also Our will and pleasure that in case persons of that description should arrive from hence, or from any other part of Our dominions, and apply to you for grants of land, you do afford them every encouragement that can be given in that undertaking, without subjecting the public to expense; and that grants of land to such amount as you shall judge proper be made out for each

____________________
1
C.O. 202/5, ff. 45-47. Printed in H.R.A., Series 1, vol. i, pp. 124-6.
2
The H.R.A. version here has 10 acres.

-438-

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