British Colonial Developments, 1774-1834

By Vincent Harlow; Frederick Madden | Go to book overview

tage industrious emigrant artificers and labourers would come here, were a free passage granted them by Government at home.

It is however essential that no prospect be held out to this class of emigrants beyond the usual reward which follows industry and regularity, and that if they are sent out at public expense they shall not continue to be maintained at such expense beyond a very limited period subsequent to their arrival (except in cases of sickness), which limitation must have the effect of forcing them into employment, from which numbers would hold back so long as they could find maintenance without working for it. It is also to be remembered that the class of emigrants is not in general composed of men of those industrious and orderly habits which would ensure to themselves success in their undertaking, but is more correctly described by Capt. Beaver as a set of 'drunken, laxy, dishonest, impatient cowards'. From such characters I must rely upon your Lordship's best endeavours to protect us, as it must be obvious how troublesome to the Colonial Magistracy and how injurious to our prosperity they would be.

Trusting that these observations are not irrelevant to the information your Lordship has required from me. . . .


54
CIRCULAR LETTER ISSUED BY THE COLONIAL OFFICE, 18191

I have to acquaint you in reply to your letter of the--that the following are the conditions under which it is proposed to give encouragement to emigration to the Cape of Good Hope.

The sufferings to which many individuals have been exposed who have emigrated to His Majesty's foreign possessions, unconnected and unprovided with any capital, or even the means of support, having been very afflicting to themselves, and equally burthensome to the colonies to which they have proceeded, the Government have determined to confine the application of the money recently voted by Address in the House of Commons, to those persons who possessing the means will engage to carry out, at the least, ten able-bodied individuals above eighteen years of age, with or without families, the Government always reserving to itself the right of selecting from the several offers made to them those which may prove upon examination to be most eligible.

In order to give some security to the Government, that the persons undertaking to make these establishments, have the means of doing so,

____________________
1
R.C.C., vol. xii, pp. 225-7. See also Vansittart speech, 12 July 1819, Parl. Debates, vol. xl, 1549.

-471-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
British Colonial Developments, 1774-1834
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 622

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.