British Colonial Developments, 1774-1834

By Vincent Harlow; Frederick Madden | Go to book overview
be set at liberty, with leave to return to their country and friends. Of this your messengers will inform you. . . .I have also to make another request. When your people make custom they kill persons who have done no crime; now, if you would abolish this cruel practice, your name would become greater than if you gained 20 battles, and you would get much favour in the eyes of the King, my master. If you cannot do this at once, because it would offend your people, then let it be done by degrees, and after some time your people will be pleased and rejoice.I again request that you will speedily send back the messengers; and I bid you farewell. . . .
16
R. W. HAY TO GEORGE BARNES, ROBERT BROWN AND MATTHEW FORSTER, 30 October 18281
GENTLEMEN,I am directed by Secretary Sir George Murray, to acquaint you that he has had under his most attentive consideration the several papers and communications which have been successively received from you, as well as from the Gold Coast, upon the subject of the measures which it may be proper to adopt for the security of British trade, and for the protection of British residents in that quarter, in consequence of the determination to which His Majesty's Government have come of withdrawing the public establishments and garrisons from the forts of Cape Coast Castle and Accra; and I am further to acquaint you, that Sir George Murray is disposed to recommend that these forts be delivered over to the merchants residing there, and held by them under the following conditions; viz.
1. That the forts of Cape Coast Castle and Accra shall continue to be dependencies of the Government of Sierra Leone.
2. That British law shall consequently continue to be in force in the said dependencies.
3. That the affairs of the forts shall be chiefly regulated by you as a committee, or by a committee of those merchants of London, who shall be chosen by His Majesty's Government, as often as occasion may require.
4. That five of the resident merchants, whose names may be approved by the Secretary of State, upon the recommendation of the committee of London merchants, be empowered to form themselves into a counsel of government according to such rules and regulations
____________________
1
Parl. Papers, 1830 (57), vol. xxi, pp. 60-61. George Barnes, Robert Brown, and Matthew Forster were leading merchants on the Gold Coast. The forts had been handed over to the Company in June 1828.

-499-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
British Colonial Developments, 1774-1834
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 622

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.