British Colonial Developments, 1774-1834

By Vincent Harlow; Frederick Madden | Go to book overview

see that rule rigidly enforced, communicating to the landdrosts of the adjoining districts, whether Tulbagh or Graaff Reynet, such infractions thereof as may come to your knowledge; but as it may be necessary that the heemraden should obtain a moderate supply from time to time, you will be pleased to communicate their wants to this Government, when his Excellency will use his discretion as to what they shall be furnished with. You will, in other respects, keep up a frequent communication with the magistrates of the above-mentioned districts, in order that they may be apprized of all circumstances which it may be useful to them to know relative to these tribes, and their communications with the colonists. . . .


24
MEMORIAL SUBMITTED BY THE ALBANY SETTLERS TO LORD BATHURST, 10 March 18231

... That the most pressing and insupportable of their grievances arise from the constant depredations of the Caffres, who have within a few months committed several murders, and deprived the settlement of the greater part of its cattle; that their depredations are in a great measure produced by relinquishing that line of policy which held out to those tribes a hope of procuring, by friendly barter, such commodities as their acquired wants have rendered necessary, and which they are now obliged to procure by theft or force; by discountenancing and withdrawing the military force from the new settlement of Fredericksburg, and permitting the Caffres to plunder and force the settlers to retire, and ultimately to burn it to the ground; by withdrawing from the Fish River a line of posts which had previously effectually protected the settlers; by refusing aid to the more advanced farmers, plundering parties have been encouraged to drive those in, and afterwards to extend their incursions to all parts of the settlement, and even beyond it; by exasperating that tribe which had hitherto preserved the appearances of friendship in attempting to seize their chief (Gaika) in his own village; and by withholding from the local military authorities that discretionary power with which they were formerly vested, which by enabling them to enforce summary restitution, showed the Caffres that the offence must instantly be followed by the punishment; whereas, by waiting the decision of the Commander-in-Chief, 600 miles distant, in every emergency, offences are allowed to accumulate to an alarming amount; and the slender means of defence the settlement possesses, deprived of the power of acting with promptitude, is forced to present to the Caffres at once the appearance of enmity and weakness.

____________________
1

C.O. 48/60. Printed in R.C.C., vol. xv, p. 309.

-513-

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