British Colonial Developments, 1774-1834

By Vincent Harlow; Frederick Madden | Go to book overview

9
CAPE COLONY: RESOLUTION OF THE HOUSE OF COMMONS, 15 July 18281
Resolved, That this House has observed with great satisfaction that the original natives of South Africa have always been recognized by the British Government as a free people, having a lawful abode in the colony; and that the British Government has promised to protect their persons, property and possessions, the same as those of other free people: that this House humbly solicits His Majesty to cause such instructions2 to be sent to the colony of the Cape of Good Hope as shall most effectually secure to all the natives of South Africa the same freedom and protection as are enjoyed by other free people of that colony, whether English or Dutch: that this House further humbly requests His Majesty to order copies or extracts of the Special Reports of the Commissioners at the Cape of Good Hope, relative to the condition of the Hottentots and Bushmen, together with the papers given in to the Commissioners by Dr. Philip, and the memorials addressed to the Colonial Office by the directors of the London Missionary Society, to be laid before this House.
10
CAPE COLONY: FIFTIETH ORDINANCE 17 July 18283
Ordinance of his Honour the Lieutenant-Governor in Council, for improving the condition of Hottentots and other free persons of colour at the Cape of Good Hope, and for consolidating and amending the laws affecting those persons. . . .
II. And whereas by usage and custom of this colony Hottentots and other free persons of colour have been subjected to certain restraints as to their residence, mode of life, and employment, and to certain compulsory services to which others of His Majesty's subjects are not liable; be it therefore enacted, that from after the passing of this ordinance, no Hottentot or other free person of colour, lawfully
____________________
1
Hansard, vol. xix, 1694. This Resolution was moved by Fowell Buxton and seconded by Sir George Murray.
2
Such instructions were of course unnecessary, for the 50th Ordinance had been promulgated only two days after the Commons debate.
3
ParL Papers, 1835 (50), vol. xxxix pp. 169-73. This was the work of Acting- GovernorBourke on the basis of a report in April 1828 by Andries Stockenstrom, the Commissioner-General of the Eastern Districts. This Ordinance was ratified by an Order in Council of 15 January 1820. Another of April 1829 applied similar principles to the free 'coloureds' of Trinidad.

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