Media and Society: Critical Perspectives

By Graeme Burton | Go to book overview

INDEX
access to information 206
active audience 88–9
ethnography 89
uses and gratifications 89
actualization 212–13
advertising 7, 14, 18–20, 224–7, 301
advertorials 229
and audiences 233–6
and children 243–7
commodification 238–40
discourses, ideologies, myths and representations 240–3
key words 226
nature 225–8
oppositions and tensions 227–8
and persuasion 236–8
relationship with media 228–30
and society 230–3
see also women's magazines
Advertising Standards Authority 23
children 243
AFP 288
Al-Jazeera 289
alienation 57
alternative channels of distribution 207
alternative models 38–40
audience factors 39
BBC 39–40
economic determinants 38–9
alternative reading 90
AP 288
approaches to film 173–96
British film industry 174
British genres 185
looking and gazing: spectator, image, meaning 188–95
main production functions 178
political economy and British film industry 175–87
spectatorship 174
archetypes 63
Associated Press 9
audiences: violence 118–21
child audience 119–21
audiences
advertising 233–6
children 301–2
global 344–5
identification 265
lifestyles 235–6
market value 235
news 300–4
participation 269
and public sphere 95–7
viral marketing 234–5
see also audiences and effects
audiences and consumption 165–72
defining audiences 166
gender 170–2
reception 166–8
subcultures and identities 168–70
audiences and effects 3, 16–18, 81–106
active audience 88–9
commodified audience 85–8
concepts of audiences 83–5
gazing and looking 92–3
gender modelling 102–5
influences and effects 97–102
and public sphere 95–7
reading audience 90–1
taking pleasure 93–5
transmission model 82
BBC 9, 39–40
licence fee 13
regulation 23
binary oppositions 54
British Board of Film Classification (BBFC) 23
British film industry 174
historical considerations 176–80
major genres 185
problems 183–5
see also approaches to film
British Screen Finance Ltd 178–9, 181, 184
broadband 209
Broadcast Advertising Clearance Centre 229–30
Broadcasters’ Audience Research Board (BARB) 87, 233
Broadcasting Complaints Commission 23
censorship 21–6
film 177
Channel 4 9
characteristics of institutions
conglomeration 11
diversification 12
lateral integration 11–12
multi-nationalism 11
vertical integration 10
child audience 119–21, 242–3
advertising 243–7
indirect selling 244
persuasion 238
classic realist text 56
CNN 289
codes 49–50
cognitive dissonance 237
commodification 238–40, 301, 316
see also sport, media, commodification
commodified audience 85–8
computer games 209–10
concepts of audiences 83–5
class 84–5
narrowcasting 84
confessions 267–8
confirmation 214–15
conglomeration 11
consensus 293–4
constructed reality 277
constructed text 46–7
consumption see advertising
Contempt of Court Act 1981 25
content 52
conventions 57
polysemic texts 71
convergence 210–12

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