How to Be a Student: 100 Great Ideas and Practical Habits for Students Everywhere

By Sarah Moore; Maura Murphy | Go to book overview
Contents
Dedicationix
Acknowledgementsx
Introductionxi
PART 1
Insights and ideas for when you first arrive1
1 Remembering that humans are designed to learn3
2 Not letting money issues get in the way4
3 Being strict about part-time work5
4 Developing study rituals7
5 Having a calendar and an appointments diary9
6 Preparing to be disillusioned10
7 Turning up to your lectures11
8 Getting your learning abilities checked12
9 Getting help when you need it13
10 Preventing small obstacles from becoming big problems14
11 Being the first to admit when you don’t understand15
12 Decorating your study space16
13 Buying a dictionary and a thesaurus17
14 Organizing your study materials and learning resources18
15 Regular ‘study snacks’ are better than occasional ‘study binges’19
16 Understanding boredom20
17 Developing your own personal coding system23
18 Phoning home24
19 Talking to others about your study tasks25
20 Setting better study goals27
21 Always having someone know where you are29
22 Having a social life that supports your learning30
23 Accepting that bureaucracy is just part of life32
24 Getting regular exercise34
25 Eating wisely35
26 Drinking37
27 Sleeping enough (but not too much)39
28 Breathing properly40

-v-

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