New Voices on the Harlem Renaissance: Essays on Race, Gender, and Literary Discourse

By Australia Tarver; Barnes C. Paula | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

This project has included the advice, support, and help from a number of people to whom we are very grateful. We benefited extensively from the advice and direction of scholars Sharon M. Harris, Alan Shepard, Simon Joyce, Linda K. Hughes, and Richard Enos. For aid in researching and locating copyright owners and sources for illustrations we are grateful to authors Maureen Honey, Venetria Patton, and Anne Carroll, who responded quickly and precisely, despite busy schedules. We thank Jimmy N. Webb, Copyright Clearance Coordinator, our library “angel,” at the Jean and Alexander Heard Library, Vanderbilt University, who went to great lengths to help us identify copyright sources. We appreciate the generous and expeditious consent by the Urban League to use illustrations from Opportunity. We owe a special thanks to Sherin Henderson, Peabody Librarian at the William R. and Norma B. Harvey Library, Hampton University, for the digital versions of two illustrations from Opportunity, and Eileen Johnston, Registrar of the Howard University Gallery of Art, for her generous agreement to loan us a slide of an art piece by Lois Mailou Jones. Identifying and locating illustrations brought us closer to the possibility of including them in this collection, but the real credit for transforming a number of the illustrations into camera-ready form goes to Nancy White, administrative secretary in the English Department at Texas Christian University, Damon Mack, Australia’s nephew, and Austin Lingerfelt, whose photoshop skills far exceeded our expectations.

We received manuscript support from Danielle Gueguen, a student assistant at TCU who reformatted and typed sections of the manuscript with amazing speed, Susan Layne, a TCU administrator, who patiently retyped and revised the most difficult sections of the manuscript, and Jennifer Hritz, a doctoral graduate who seemingly performed miracles in reformatting text.

Support from family and friends and advisors must also be recognized. Australia appreciates the assurance of her teenaged

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