100 Greatest Science Inventions of All Time

By Kendall Haven | Go to book overview

Inventions That
Predate History

Why Are These Included in the List of
Greatest Science Inventions?

A few important inventions were in use so long ago that they predate written records. We don’t know how they were invented or who invented them, or even if they had a true, single inventor.

However, the following nine inventions are so basic to human and scientific beginnings that they must be mentioned. Take these away, and our civilized world falls apart. They form the first cornerstones of human progress.


Prehistory Critical Science Inventions

Balance Scale

A balance scale is a way to compare two weights. A teeter-totter is an example of a balance scale. Metal scales dating to 5000 B.C. have been found in archeological digs. Balance scales were in use by 4000 B.C. in both Egypt and China. Egyptians were able to accurately measure to a small fraction of an ounce by 1500 B.C.

The ability to compare two weights led to units of weight (tons, ounces, grams, pounds, etc.) and to number scales. Commerce evolved because balance scales gave merchants the ability to measure weights of product and payment and to measure their gains and losses.


Bow and Arrow

The first humanoids used bows and arrows for hunting sometime before 30,000 B.C. Those early bows were little more than a vine stretched across a bent sapling branch. The first arrows were most likely sharpened sticks

We do not know how, when, or why, some clever human decided that short spears (arrows) would go farther, harder, and faster and be more deadly if he used the spring and power of a thin branch and a vine to propel them. But someone did, and the bow and arrow was born.

Over time, humans improved the flexibility, strength, spring, and resiliency of their bows. Surely bow makers conducted thousands of experiments, testing and comparing different types of wood and of building and layering a bow. Creating better hunting weapons helped early man learn how to conduct experiments, tests, and scientific investigations.

-xvii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
100 Greatest Science Inventions of All Time
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 336

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.