100 Greatest Science Inventions of All Time

By Kendall Haven | Go to book overview

Television

Year of Invention: 1927

What Is It? An electronic system for recording, instantly transmitting, and dis-
playing moving images.

Who Invented It? Philo Farnsworth (in San Francisco)


Why Is This Invention One of the 100 Greatest?

Television radically changed the way we market ideas and products; the way we seek news, information, education and entertainment; and the way we use and allocate free time. Television has connected the world in a way neither still pictures nor radio could do. It has shown us what the rest of world looks like and how other peoples live and act.

On the down side, television has contributed to a sedentary life style. The term “couch potato” was created to describe those who watch large amounts of TV. Many studies have linked television to an increased prevalence of eating disorders, indifference to violence, fear of the outside world, and reduced self-image. For good and for bad, television has changed modern lives, attitudes, and values.


History of the Invention

What Did People Do Before?

From earliest times, traveling minstrels and storytellers delivered news and entertainment. By 1500, masses of books existed thanks to the printing press. Newspapers followed in the seventeenth century.

In the late 1800s, publishers added magazines to their offerings to meet the information and entertainment needs of the public. By the first years of the twentieth century, commercial radio had come of age. Movies joined the popular entertainment choices in the 1920s with the advent of sound.


How Was Television Invented?

Three men claimed to be the father of television. Two worked in America, one in England. The Englishman, John Baird, technically was the first to build a working television. However, his system was a mechanical system that depended on two synchronized spinning disks, similar in concept to the picture produced by flipping through pages of cartoon drawings to create motion. It was a dead-end technology, completely abandoned by 1936.

-207-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
100 Greatest Science Inventions of All Time
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 336

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.