100 Greatest Science Inventions of All Time

By Kendall Haven | Go to book overview

Jet Engine

Year of Invention: 1939

What Is It? An engine that produces motion through backward discharge of a
jet of fluid.

Who Invented It? Frank Whittle (in England) and Hans von Ohain (in Ger-
many)


Why Is This Invention One of the 100 Greatest?

The jet engine revolutionized air travel and aircraft design. Jets were also the starting point for rocket flight and rocket design, and thus for space travel. The speed of jet engines is an essential aspect of how we plan our travel, work, and leisure. Jets support larger aircraft and carry greater loads.


History of the Invention

What Did People Do Before?

Propeller planes reached speeds of 200 mph by the 1930s. By 1920, two-engine prop planes had the range to fly passengers around the world. However, flight was still a luxury for the rich. Engineers knew that propeller planes would soon reach their upper limit for speed and range.


How Was the Jet Engine Invented?

Two men, each totally unaware of the other’s work, developed a jet engine. One, Frank Whittle, worked in London. The other, Hans von Ohain, worked in secrecy for the German military. Whittle was the first to develop a working jet engine, but Ohain’s was the first to fly.

In 1926, 21-year-old airplane mechanic Frank Whittle began to study the idea of airplane propulsion without propellers. In 1928, he decided that a gas turbine could create a jet of hot exhaust gas capable of propelling a plane.

Gas turbine engines were well known by this time, being used to create mechanical action (e.g., turning a motor shaft or driving a pump). Fierce plumes of exhaust gas jetted out of the rear of these turbines. Whittle calculated that a supercharged burner would exhaust a greater volume and velocity of gas than the volume that entered. This differential would create forward motion for a plane.

-225-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
100 Greatest Science Inventions of All Time
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 336

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.