Computers, Phones, and the Internet: Domesticating Information Technology

By Robert Kraut; Malcolm Brynin et al. | Go to book overview

Contributors

Ben Anderson is currently deputy director of Chimera, a research institute of the University of Essex, and he is also a visiting researcher at the University of Essex’s Institute for Social and Economic Research (ISER). His general research interests include longitudinal time-use data analysis and e-social science and spatial microsimulation. More specifically, he is interested in the application of behavioral science techniques to the study of technology-mediated human communication; the co-evolution of people and the technology they use; and the relationship among ICT, social capital, and quality of life. He has a BSc in biology and computer science (Southampton University, United Kingdom) and a PhD in computer studies (Loughborough University, United Kingdom).

Maria Bakardjieva is associate professor at the Faculty of Communication and Culture at the University of Calgary. She holds a PhD in sociology from the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences (1995) and a PhD in communication from Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, British Columbia (2000). Her research interests focus on the social processes of integrating new communication media into everyday practices and diverse cultures. Ethnographic studies of Internet use in the home, virtual communities, and online education have been among her primary research projects in the past 10 years. She is author of Internet Society: The Internet in Everyday Life (2005) and coeditor of How Canadians Communicate (2003). More information is available at http://www.ucalgary.ca/UofC/faculties/COMCUL/ Web/instr/bakardjieva.html.

Gretchen Barbatsis earned a PhD in speech communication from the University of Minnesota, 1979. She is currently a professor in the Department of Telecommunication, Information Studies, and Media at Michigan State University and has previously held positions at Middle Tennessee State University and the University of Nebraska. Professor Barbatsis served as director of the Mass Media in Britain Program, Office of Overseas Studies, Michigan State University, and has participated in numerous international research projects, most recently in Nigeria. Her research interests include sense-making aesthetics, hypermediated telepresence, and the social consequences of digital exclusion for opportunities for transformative interactivity of being “voiced” in cyberspace.

Frank Biocca earned a PhD in mass communication from the University of Wisconsin in 1989. He is currently SBC Chair of Telecommunication, Information Studies and Media at Michigan State University. Previous positions include professor, researcher, and lecturer at the University of California–Berkeley, Stanford University, University of North Carolina, and University of Wisconsin. Professor Biocca is interested in how mind and media interfaces can be coupled to extend

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