Computers, Phones, and the Internet: Domesticating Information Technology

By Robert Kraut; Malcolm Brynin et al. | Go to book overview

6
Examining the Effect of Internet
Use on Television Viewing

Details Make a Difference

Robert Kraut

Sara Kiesler

Bonka Boneva

The proportion of U.S. households with a computer soared from 8.2% in 1984 to 56.5% in 2001. By September 2001, over 50% of U.S. households also had Internet access (U.S. Department of Commerce, 2002). The dramatic changes now occurring in household computing have the potential to change the lives of average citizens as much as the telephone did in the early 1900s and the television did in the 1950s and 1960s. Social scientists are now attempting to document how computing and the Internet are becoming integrated into the daily lives of users and the effects that this use is having. For example, efforts to document the effect of Internet use are occurring in the domains of psychological use of time and other media (see chapter 5), establishment and maintenance of social relationships (see chapter 19), political participation (Katz & Rice, 2002), psychological functioning, health, education (see chapter 11), and consumer behavior, among other domains.

This chapter examines the methods that many social scientists deploy to examine this effect. We review prior literature to illustrate problems that are widespread in examining the influence of Internet use. We argue that much of this research reaches limited or even erroneous conclusions, both because it uses cross-sectional data to draw causal implications and because it fails to distinguish between varieties of Internet use.

The empirical section of this chapter is based on a national panel survey of 980 individuals. We show that the Internet is used for a wide range of functions. We use confirmatory factor analysis to disaggregate overall Internet use into a set of components, which are only moderately related with each other: interpersonal communication with friends and family, interpersonal communication with strangers, instrumental information seeking, entertainment, and commerce. Just as one would expect that chatting with friends on the phone and watching entertainment on television would have different influences on those who use these earlier technologies, so too would one expect that using the Internet for different purposes will have different effects on its users.

The empirical study examines the effects of Internet use on television viewing, illustrating the time-use perspective on the effect of new media. We use hierarchical linear growth modeling to differentiate cross-sectional from longitudinal relationships. Conclusions from cross-sectional data differ from those based on longitudinal data, and both sets of conclusions depend on how people use the Internet. For example, the cross-sectional analyses

-70-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Computers, Phones, and the Internet: Domesticating Information Technology
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 326

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.