Computers, Phones, and the Internet: Domesticating Information Technology

By Robert Kraut; Malcolm Brynin et al. | Go to book overview

13 Teens on the Internet
Interpersonal Connection, Identity,
and Information

Patricia M. Greenfield

Elisheva F. Gross

Kaveri Subrahmanyam

When the New York Times Magazine looked to teenagers to herald the dawn of the 21st century, it found them online. In an article in the magazine's millennium issue, journalist Camille Sweeney (1999) marveled at the nature, speed, and sheer abundance of communication among teenagers whom she had observed in chat rooms and message boards throughout AOL and the Web. In the ensuing years, teenagers' use of the Internet (and in particular instant messaging [IMing]) has grown to the point at which today's youth are referred to as the Internet (Tapscott, 1998) and IM generation (Pew, 2001).

Though about 75% of young people in the United States are estimated to have Internet access, there is very little research on aspects of their Internet use, such as “its nature and quality, its social conditions, cultural practices, and personal meanings” (Livingstone, 2003, p. 159). The unique social and communicative environment of the Internet gives rise to intriguing research questions about its use among youth: How do teenagers typically spend their time online? How important is communication in this total picture, and by what means do adolescents communicate on the Internet? What is the nature of the online culture that teenagers are constructing together? These broad issues also give rise to more specific questions: Do teenagers use the disembodied and faceless nature that often characterizes Internet communication to experiment with identities, or do they compensate for this disembodiment by developing new ways to express identity in the online medium? Do teenagers take advantage of the outreach capabilities of the Internet to seek social support and romance and discuss critical but difficult issues like race, sex, and illness with strangers, or do they intensify existing relations by communicating mostly with friends and family? In this chapter, we begin to answer these questions through ongoing research at the Children's Digital Media Center (CDMC) at UCLA.

We begin by reviewing research by Gross (2004) that, together with recent findings from national surveys on Internet use (e.g., Pew Internet and American Life Project, 2001), provides a context for closer examination of the nature of adolescent online communication. Then we review research on the nature, extent, and function of teens' online pretending. In the next section, we examine and describe the online culture constructed by participants in teen chat rooms. Here we review two studies that examine how participants in online teen chat rooms address critical developmental issues, such as identity, sexuality, partner selection, peer relations, and race (Subrahmanyam, Greenfield, &

-185-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Computers, Phones, and the Internet: Domesticating Information Technology
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 326

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.