Gangrene and Glory: Medical Care during the American Civil War

By Frank R. Freemon | Go to book overview

Subject Index
African ship fever, 7, 62, 93
Alabama regiment: 5th, 187
Alabama, C.S.S., warship, 93, 95–100
alcohol, 23, 58, 78, 86, 90, 127, 187, 218, 219
ambulance corps, 44, 87–88, 171–72
American Expeditionary Force, 200
American Medical Association, 21, 126, 204, 214
American Neurological Association, 224
American Medical Times, 36–37, 84, 146
amputation: all four limbs, 192; arm, 48–49, 73, 86, 102, 109, 184; leg, 31, 96; refused, 81, 157
Andersonville prison, 191
Antietam, battle of, 83, 182, 200
Apache Pass, 19, 28
aphasia, 183
aphonia, 129
appropriations, 29, 32, 34, 130, 132
Arkansas, C.S.S., warship, 63
Army Medical Museum, 86, 160, 161, 183, 189
Army of Northern Virginia, 83, 102, 107, 129, 187, 200, 209
Army of Tennessee, 147, 167, 187, 199
Army of the Gulf, 221–22
Army of the Potomac, 68–70, 88, 107, 161, 171, 177, 181, 187, 199, 221
Army of the Tennessee, 58, 88, 167, 223
Army of Virginia, 76
arrow wounds, 23
athetosis, 224
Atlanta, battle of, 147, 167, 223–24
Atlantic Monthly, 192, 195
Ball's Bluff, battle of, 78
Baltic, C.S.S., warship, 95
Baltic, steamboat, 177
Baltimore riot, 35
Baruch Plan, 200
“Battle Hymn of the Republic,” 109
Belmont, battle of, 61, 86
Benton, U.S.S., warship, 63
Berdan's Sharpshooters, 72
Black Horse Tavern, 112
blindness, 13, 165, 212
blockade, 126, 153, 218
Boston Medical and Surgical Journal, 146
Boston University School of Medicine, 25, 198
British Sanitary Commission, 36
Buckner Hospital, 153
Bull Run, battle of, 35–37, 46, 222
Cairo, Illinois, 54, 61, 117
calomel, 25, 26, 142, 219
Camp Letterman, Gettysburg, 112, 114, 196
Carnton House, Franklin, 158, 204
Carver Hospital, Washington, 184
Champion's Hill, battle of, 116–17, 223
Charing Cross Hospital, London, 95
Charity Hospital, New Orleans, 161
Charles McDougall, U.S.S., hospital ship, 142
Charleston riot, 162
Charlottesville. Virginia, 78–79, 126
Cherbourg Hospital, France, 99–100
Chester Hospital, Pennsylvania, 182
Chickamauga, battle of, 157, 202
Chimborazo, riverboat, 77
Chimborazo Hospital, 58, 77–79, 82, 187
chloroform, 41, 48, 184
cholera, 192
Christian Commission, 52, 111, 172
Christian Street Hospital, 89
City Hall Hospital, 152–53
City of Alton, riverboat, 64
City of Memphis, riverboat, 62
City Point, Virgina, 181, 183, 184, 187
clay eating, 24
climate, effect on disease, 19, 21, 24, 29, 90, 140, 223
coffee, 126
Cold Harbor, battle of, 176
College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, 25, 160
Commercial Hotel, 63
Commissary Department, 21, 88, 130, 167
Confederate Medical and Surgical Journal, 129, 219, 220
Connecticut regiments: 5th, 82; 17th, 107
conscription, 163, 165, 210
constipation, 41
contingency theory, 221
convalescent leave, 32–34, 121, 126, 128, 129, 157, 178, 224
Crimean War, 36, 48, 52, 86, 202
culture broth. See petri dish
Dacouta, U.S.S., warship, 94
D.A. January, U.S.S., hospital ship, 62, 117, 142–43, 176
Daniel Webster, steamer, 73

-251-

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