The Social Psychology of Drug Abuse

By Steve Sussman; Susan L. Ames | Go to book overview

HUMAN AGGRESSION
Second Edition
Russell G. Geen
What sort of conditions provoke aggressive behaviour among humans?
Why are some people more aggressive than others?
How do normal human characteristics like thoughts and feelings enter into
aggressive behaviour?

The fully revised and updated edition of this successful book offers a brief intro-
duction to the psychology of human aggression. Aggression is defined as an act of
intentional harm inflicted on another person in response to some provoking
circumstance, through a process involving thought, feeling, judgement and motiva-
tion. Several theoretical schemes are discussed, according to which these psycholo-
gical processes are shown to interact with each other to determine the likelihood
and intensity of aggressive behaviour. The theoretical material is followed by
chapters in which the psychological processes are used to analyse such practical
problems as sexual and partner abuse, bullying, delinquency, and the effects
of violence in the media, video games, and sporting events. The second edition
includes new material on the difference between proactive versus reactive aggres-
sion, on social information-processing, and on the effects of violent games. It also
pays increased attention to instrumental versus affective aggression, to age, sex
and personality as moderators, and to the impact of aggression on everyday life.
In all, the book provides an accessible text for students of psychology and
others interested in obtaining a concise overview of research and theory on human
aggression and violence.


Contents

Introduction to the study of aggressionThe provocation of aggressionIntervening
processes in aggression
Moderator variables in aggressionAggression in life and
society
Aggression in entertainmentHostility, health and adjustmentPostscript
GlossaryReferences.

192pp 0 335 20471 6 (Paperback) 0 335 20472 4 (Hardback)

-173-

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