Choices and Changes: Interest Groups in the Electoral Process

By Michael M. Franz | Go to book overview

6 Following 527s and Watching
Issue Advocacy

In Chapter 4, I demonstrated that partisan PACs altered their hard money contribution strategies in the late 1990s, becoming more partisan in years when the control of Congress hung in the balance. In Chapter 5, I broadened the analysis to soft money contributions. Both empirical analyses focused on how interest groups contribute funds to other political actors. In this chapter, I switch the analysis to examine how interest groups raise and spend money independently of the candidates or parties they are trying to help.

I focus the chapter on interest group advertisements in the 2000, 2002, and 2004 federal elections and on the activity of 527s in the 2004 elections. Both political advertisements and 527s have been the topic of considerable debate in recent years. Bernadette A. Budde of the Business-Industry Political Action Committee had this to say about issue advocacy in 1998: “[It] could have caught people off-guard in '96. In '98 it may look new. By 2000 it's not going to be a new technique anymore. The campaign world will have adapted.”1 Budde was exactly right, and the presence of nonmagic word ads in 1996–2000 compelled reformers in 2002 to establish restrictions on which groups could fund political ads.

These changes spawned the “explosion” of 527s in the 2004 elections. As noted in Chapter 2, 527s spent more than $150 million in

-118-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Choices and Changes: Interest Groups in the Electoral Process
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • 1: The Puzzle of Interest Group Electioneering 1
  • 2: Election Law and Electoral Politics Between Feca and Bcra 15
  • 3: A Theory of Emergent and Changing Interest Group Tactics 51
  • 4: Putting Pacs in (Political) Context(S) 75
  • 5: Understanding Soft Money 95
  • 6: Following 527s and Watching Issue Advocacy 118
  • 7: Tracking the Regulatory Context 145
  • 8: Conclusion 172
  • Appendix: Pac Ideology Measure 189
  • Notes 193
  • Bibliography 207
  • Index 217
  • Political Science and Public Policy/American Studies 229
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 229

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.