Choices and Changes: Interest Groups in the Electoral Process

By Michael M. Franz | Go to book overview

Appendix: PAC Ideology Measure
Using a methodology developed by Franklin (n.d.), I leverage PAC contributions to individual federal candidates as information in estimating a PAC's liberal-conservative ideology. I created a large dataset that matches each PAC in my sample with each incumbent member of the House between 1983 and 2000. The dependent variable was whether the PAC gave to the candidate (or, in a different estimation, how much the PAC gave to the candidate). By controlling for common predictors of PAC contributions (including most importantly the ideology of the incumbent), I use the coefficient estimate on candidate ideology to estimate PAC ideology. Below, I list first the data for this estimation. Second, I describe the statistics behind the estimation. I conclude by outlining the data structure and the specific variables used.
Datasets
Federal Election Commission Data: Accessed Web site (www.fec.gov) on various dates
Committee Master file (separate file for each election cycle, 1984–2002)—Contains information on each registered PAC and party
Candidate Master file (separate file for each cycle, 1984–2002)— Contains information on every federal candidate
PAC contribution file (separate file for each cycle, 1984–2002)— Records all contributions from PACs to candidates and parties

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Choices and Changes: Interest Groups in the Electoral Process
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • 1: The Puzzle of Interest Group Electioneering 1
  • 2: Election Law and Electoral Politics Between Feca and Bcra 15
  • 3: A Theory of Emergent and Changing Interest Group Tactics 51
  • 4: Putting Pacs in (Political) Context(S) 75
  • 5: Understanding Soft Money 95
  • 6: Following 527s and Watching Issue Advocacy 118
  • 7: Tracking the Regulatory Context 145
  • 8: Conclusion 172
  • Appendix: Pac Ideology Measure 189
  • Notes 193
  • Bibliography 207
  • Index 217
  • Political Science and Public Policy/American Studies 229
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