Almost a Miracle: The American Victory in the War of Independence

By John Ferling | Go to book overview

20
“BLOODY AND SEVERE”: THE PIVOTAL
SOUTHERN WAR, EARLY 1781

NO YEAR SINCE 1777 had dawned with the flurry of activity that ushered in 1781. On January 2, Benedict Arnold arrived suddenly at Jamestown, Virginia, with a large British invasion force. At about the same moment, Cornwallis's army at Winnsboro, South Carolina, set out to find the rebels under Morgan and Greene.

Arnold's army was the second to raid Virginia within seventy days. In October, at Cornwallis's behest, Clinton had sent off a 2,200-man force under Major General Alexander Leslie to provide a “diversion” for the redcoats fighting further south. Leslie's presence, it was thought, would prevent Virginia from dispatching reinforcements to the Carolinas and it might lead it to recall some units. Leslie's mission was a work in progress. While sowing destruction, he was also to interdict rebel supply lines, inhibiting the shipment of much needed supplies to the Carolinas. According to what occurred in North Carolina, he might even move there to join with Cornwallis. Leslie arrived in Virginia just as autumn's splendorous colors garnished the landscape. After putting his men ashore at Portsmouth, Newport News, and Hampton, the cavalry and light infantry swept the peninsula between the James and York Rivers nearly as far inland as Yorktown, then marauded across the extreme eastern end of Virginia below Cape Henry, pillaging and resettling several families of Loyalists that had sailed with them. The redcoats had no chance to move further inland, as Leslie, in the aftermath of the debacle at King's Mountain, was ordered to join Cornwallis. He sailed in November, only about twenty days after his invasion began, taking with him the recently repatriated Tory families, who would face a bleak future if left behind.1

-477-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Almost a Miracle: The American Victory in the War of Independence
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 679

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.