Disunion! The Coming of the American Civil War, 1789-1859

By Elizabeth R. Varon | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

As I wrote this book I benefited immeasurably from the sage advice of friends and colleagues. Keith Poulter was the first one to read the whole manuscript draft through—and his keen eye caught and corrected many infelicities of style and substance. Richard Newman and David Waldstreicher read the sections on the early republic and provided me with a wealth of insights and suggestions; they have helped me, as has my affiliation with the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic, appreciate just how crucial the “founding” decades are to understanding sectional tensions between North and South.

I owe my greatest editorial debt to Gary W. Gallagher and T. Michael Parrish, the Littlefield series editors, whose careful and generous attention to my manuscript modeled just how peer review, ideally, should work. Their comments, along with those of an anonymous “outside” reader, opened up new analytic vistas for me and charted a course for my revisions. I thank Stevie Champion for her thorough copyediting of the manuscript. And UNC Press editor-in-chief David Perry gracefully guided me through the publication process.

My colleagues at Temple University, too, shaped this book; working alongside them has made me a better and happier historian. I am especially grateful to two successive department chairs, Richard Immerman and Drew Isenberg, and to our former dean, Susan Herbst, for their support.

Thanks to the city of Philadelphia's matchless historical resources, it was a pleasure to research this book. I relied on the kind offices and expert assistance of the staffs of Temple's Paley Library and its Charles L. Blockson AfroAmerican Collection, the Historical Society of Pennsylvania, the Library Company of Philadelphia, the University of Pennsylvania's Van Pelt Library, the Civil War and Underground Railroad Museum, and the Friends' Histori

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