If That Ever Happens to Me: Making Life and Death Decisions after Terri Schiavo

By Lois Shepherd | Go to book overview

STUDIES IN SOCIAL MEDICINE

Nancy M. P. King, Gail E. Henderson, and Jane Stein, eds., Beyond Regulations: Ethics in Human Subjects Research (1999).

Laurie Zoloth, Health Care and the Ethics of Encounter: A Jewish Discussion of Social Justice (1999).

Susan M. Reverby, ed., Tuskegee's Truths: Rethinking the Tuskegee Syphilis Study (2000).

Beatrix Hoffman, The Wages of Sickness: The Politics of Health Insurance in Progressive America (2000).

Margarete Sandelowski, Devices and Desires: Gender, Technology, and American Nursing (2000).

Keith Wailoo, Dying in the City of the Blues: Sickle Cell Anemia and the Politics of Race and Health (2001).

Judith Andre, Bioethics as Practice (2002).

Chris Feudtner, Bittersweet: Diabetes, Insulin, and the Transformation of Illness (2003).

Ann Folwell Stanford, Bodies in a Broken World: Women Novelists of Color and the Politics of Medicine (2003).

Lawrence O. Gostin, The AIDS Pandemic: Complacency, Injustice, and Unfulfilled Expectations (2004).

Arthur A. Daemmrich, Pharmacopolitics: Drug Regulation in the United States and Germany (2004).

Carl Elliott and Tod Chambers, eds., Prozac as a Way of Life (2004).

Steven M. Stowe, Doctoring the South: Southern Physicians and Everyday Medicine in the Mid-Nineteenth Century (2004).

Arleen Marcia Tuchman, Science Has No Sex: The Life of Marie Zakrzewska, M.D. (2006).

Michael H. Cohen, Healing at the Borderland of Medicine and Religion (2006).

Keith Wailoo, Julie Livingston, and Peter Guarnaccia, eds., A Death Retold: Jesica Santillan, the Bungled Transplant, and Paradoxes of Medical Citizenship (2006).

Michelle T. Moran, Colonizing Leprosy: Imperialism and the Politics of Public Health in the United States (2007).

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