Advertising and the Mind of the Consumer: What Works, What Doesn't, and Why

By Max Sutherland | Go to book overview
CONTENTS
Figures and tablesvii
Acknowledgmentsx
About the authorxii
PART A WHY ADVERTISING HAS REMAINED A MYSTERY FOR SO LONG
Introduction3
1Influencing people: myths and mechanisms6
2Image and reality: seeing things in different ways28
3Subliminal advertising: the biggest myth of all36
4Conformity: the popular thing to do48
5The advertising message: oblique and indirect60
6'Under the radar': paid product placement72
7Silent symbols and badges of identity81
8Vicarious experience and virtual reality91
9Messages, reminders and rewards: how ads speak to us101
10What's this I'm watching? The elements that make up an ad116
11'Behavioural targeting': consumers in the crosshairs140
12The limits of advertising146
PART B WHAT WORKS, WHAT DOESN'T, AND WHY
Introduction165
13Continuous tracking: are you being followed?168
14New product launches: don't pull the plug too early175
15Planning campaign strategy around consumers' mental filing cabinets183
16What happens when you stop advertising?190
17The effectiveness of funny ads: what a laugh!198
18Learning to use shorter-length TV commercials209
19Seasonal advertising221
20Underweight advertising: execution anorexia227
21Why radio ads aren't recalled233
22Maximizing ad effectiveness: develop a unique and consistent style237

-v-

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