Advertising and the Mind of the Consumer: What Works, What Doesn't, and Why

By Max Sutherland | Go to book overview

INTRODUCTION

We saw in Part A that we can gain an important insight into advertising by asking the question, 'Who is the ad talking to?' The same applies to books like this one. Who is this book talking to? If it is aimed at the general reader it will have a different feel and style than if it is aimed at advertising practitioners or students of marketing or mass communication. Part A talked primarily to the general reader.

At this point in the book the general reader will sense a change of key. Many of the chapters that make up Part B had their origins in articles that were written for trade publications. The readers of these are advertisers and marketers who want to know more about how to make advertising work more effectively.

While this section talks primarily to these professionals, general readers should find it an interesting 'bystander' experience. In fact they may like to imagine themselves as advertisers. By looking briefly through the advertisers' eyes they will develop a greater understanding of advertising at work, and see the obstacles that advertisers strive to overcome in their attempt to influence us.

An understanding of only three technical terms is necessary for reading Part B. The first of these, adexecution, has already cropped up in Part A. A brand like Coke will often have several different ads on air in the same week. While the brand and the essential message are usually the same, the characters, dialogue or general scene may be different in each case. Each variation is referred to as an ad execution. Alternatively, you may see a 30-second ad and a fifteen-second one which is recognizable as a part of the larger ad. These are regarded as two different 'executions'. The creative execution, then, is the way that a particular ad is carried out or executed.

The second technical term is flighting. Some advertisers schedule their brand's advertising to appear every week. This is known as a

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