Advertising and the Mind of the Consumer: What Works, What Doesn't, and Why

By Max Sutherland | Go to book overview

19 SEASONAL ADVERTISING
All advertising is not created equal. And all product categories are not the same. It is clear from tracking numerous ad campaigns in various parts of the world that there are important seasonal influences on advertising. Products that are to a greater or lesser extent seasonal include:
Summer: ice creams, suntan lotions, soft drinks, swimwear, beer and charcoal.
Winter: canned soup, chocolate bars, chocolate cookies, cough and cold preparations.
Seasonal events: electric razors (most of which are sold for Father's Day and Christmas), children's shoes and school supplies (start of school year), champagne (New Year's) and greeting cards.
In addition: some public-authority and utility advertising campaigns may be distinctly seasonal, for example: save water (summer), prevent forest fires (summer), drink driving, speed kills (holiday seasons) etc.

Sometimes these things are pretty obvious, but all too often we realize this only in retrospect. It is easy to fail to be aware of them or to be distracted from them in the product management process.


Perceived popularity

I referred earlier to the 'perceived popularity' of a product and the role that advertising plays in it. Brand popularity can be self-fulfilling. If people see something as popular the chances are enhanced that, provided everything else is equal, they will follow suit and buy the brand. Perceived popularity can tip the balance.

Sometimes products gather momentum through their advertising. The brand is seen as increasingly popular. And just when it is about to

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