Not Even Past: Barack Obama and the Burden of Race

By Thomas J. Sugrue | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

I am greatly indebted to Dan Rodgers, director of the Shelby Cullom Davis Center for Historical Studies at Princeton, and Brigitta van Rheinberg, editor in chief of Princeton University Press, for inviting me to deliver the 2009 Lawrence Stone Lectures in History. My audience at Princeton was especially lively. I'd like to single out Tom Bender, Dirk Hartog, Tera Hunter, and Julian Zelizer for their intelligent questions and comments. I haven't yet met Paul Harvey to thank him in person, but his thoughtful review of my book Sweet Land of Liberty, published in Books and Culture during election week in November 2008, got me thinking about writing this one. I bounced ideas about Obama's relationship to the black freedom struggle off the graduate students in my spring 2009 seminar on the history of civil rights, and they bounced even more back. Props to Adam Goodman, Che Gossett, Rachel Guberman, Julia Gunn, Danielle Holtz, Erika Kitzmiller, Linda Maldonado, Peter Pihos, Sarah Rodriguez, and Jeffrey Silver. I am lucky to have lots of great conversationalists in my life, including several friends, colleagues, and students who might not even have known that they were serving as sounding boards for my ideas, but who helped me immensely, including Merlin Chowkwanyun, Andrew Diamond, Greg Goldman, Sally Gordon, Brittany Griebling, Steve Hahn,

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