On Fact and Fraud: Cautionary Tales from the Front Lines of Science

By David Goodstein | Go to book overview
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Notes

One
Setting the Stage

1. Richard P. Feynman, Surely You're Joking, Mr. Feynman! (New York: 1W. Norton, 1985), p. 343: “I'm talking about a specific, extra type of integrity that is not lying, but bending over backwards to show howyou're maybe wrong, that you ought to have when acting as a scientist. And this is our responsibility as scientists, certainly to other scientists, and I think to laymen.”

2. Peter Urbach, Francis Bacon's Philosophy of Science: An Account and a Reappraisal (La Salle, IL: Open Court, 1987). Urbach argues that Bacons views about method were actually much more sophisticated.

3. Karl Popper, The Logic of Scientific Discovery (New York: Routledge, 2nd edition, 2002).

4. Feynman, Surely You're Joking, p. 341.

5. U.S. Dept. of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, “Responsibilities of Awardee and Applicant Institutions for Dealing with and Reporting Possible Misconduct in Science,” Federal Register 54:32446-51 (1989).

6. Jonathan R. Cole and Stephen Cole, “The Ortega Hypothesis,” Science 178:4059,368-75 (1972).

7. Robert K. Merton, “The Matthew Effect in Science,” Science 159:3810,56-63(1968).

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