Woodrow Wilson: Revolution, War, and Peace

By Arthur S. Link | Go to book overview

Preface

This book, originally written as the Albert Shaw Lectures on Diplomatic History at The Johns Hopkins University, was first published by the Johns Hopkins University Press in 1957 under the title, Wilson the Diplomatist: A Look at His Major Foreign Policies. It was reprinted in 1963 with a “Preface to the Second Edition,” which corrected certain errors in the first printing.

When the opportunity arose to publish a new edition of the book, I originally planned to make only minor changes in the text. However, when I read the book in its entirety for the first time since 1962, I discovered that I, and numerous scholars working in the period, had learned many new things and had had many new insights about Wilson and his diplomatic policies since Wilson the Diplomatist was first published. Thus I rewrote the book. I was able to use small portions of the old book, particularly the account of Wilson's western tour in 1919. However, this is substantially a new book with new themes. They are embodied in the new title, for Wilson was the first President of the modern era to confront all the difficult problems of revolution, war, and peace.

Whether Woodrow Wilson: Revolution, War, and Peace represents a more mature understanding of Wilson the diplomatist and the legacy that he left us than was displayed in the original book, only my readers will be able to determine.

I am grateful to John Milton Cooper, Jr., William H. Harbaugh, David W. Hirst, and Richard W. Leopold for reading my manuscript with understanding and care, and for their helpful suggestions and criticisms. My wife, Margaret Douglas Link, was, as always, my best editor. Professor Harbaugh also made many suggestions for stylistic

-vii-

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Woodrow Wilson: Revolution, War, and Peace
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • 1: Wilson the Diplomatist 1
  • 2: Wilson and the Problems of Neutrality, 1914–1917 21
  • 3: Wilson and the Decisions for War 47
  • 4: Wilson and the Liberal Peace Program 72
  • 5: Wilson and the Fight for the League of Nations 104
  • Bibliographical Essay 129
  • Index 133
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