Muslims on the Americanization Path?

By Yvonne Yazbeck Haddad; John L. Esposito | Go to book overview

11

Muslims and the American Press

GREG NOAKES

Islam and Muslims have become American media mainstays in the decade and a half since the Islamic Revolution in Iran. Hardly a week goes by without news of some breaking event in the Muslim world, and with it reams of explanations of Islam and Muslims for Americans. In spite of the air time and column-inches devoted to Islam and Islamic themes, however, the performance of the mainstream American press in the coverage of Islam, Muslims, and events in the Muslim world has been little short of dismal.1

In order to understand why, it is important to answer several questions. How do the media cover Islam? What factors shape this coverage? If the performance to date has been lackluster, how can media coverage of Muslims be improved, and are these improvements likely to be made? When analyzing coverage of Muslims in the American press and the effects of that coverage on the Muslim community, it is important to keep in mind that “media” is a plural noun and remember that the media are not monolithic dispensers of information but rather a diverse array of outlets encompassing newspapers, magazines, journals, radio and television stations and networks, cable outlets, and such new technology as on-line information services. Given that diversity, it is neither useful nor illuminating to think in terms of conspiracy theories. This approach does have its adherents among critics, but ultimately it conceals much more than it reveals.

Nevertheless, the number of sources for reporting on the Middle East and the Muslim world is limited, and there is a great deal of overlap among media outlets. The three major broadcast networks (ABC, CBS, and NBC), in addition to the Cable News Network (CNN), maintain their own Middle East correspondents and special-assignment foreign correspondents. The American “newspapers of record,” the New York Times, the Washington Post, the

-285-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Muslims on the Americanization Path?
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 361

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.