Domestic Violence: A Global View

By Randal W. Summers; Allan M. Hoffman | Go to book overview

7
JAPAN

Noriyoshi Watanabe


PERCEPTIONS OF DOMESTIC VIOLENCE

In Japan, after several hundred years of national seclusion, the reform that took place in 1868 brought the collapse of the feudal society dominated by samurai warriors and triggered the modernization and westernization of the country. However, because Japan's highest priority was to catch up with Europe and America, it was necessary to adopt a centralized system of government. To achieve this, politicians had to rely on the restoration of the Emperor System. Consequently, they established a militaristic nation rather than a democratic one. Although intellectual people protested this movement, Japan voluntarily marched into international disputes and wars.

Japan's democratization essentially started after World War II.1 Although the Emperor System collapsed (or became symbolic) after the war, the idea of a male-dominated society, a vestige of feudalism, was not immediately swept away. In fact, the idea of a male-dominated society still holds in today's Japanese society as an ethic of a feudal society, although it has been weathered over time. In other words, a husband is still implicitly allowed to hit his wife as a means of discipline. It is considered natural for a wife to obey her husband because she belongs to him. No other person is allowed to say anything about the husband's behavior, no matter how violent or unreasonable it may be. Marital (or domestic) violence is considered as a mere quarrel between husband and wife, rather than a crime. It is pointless to act as a mediator for a couple who are having a quarrel. Unless marital

-83-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Domestic Violence: A Global View
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Contents viii
  • Series Foreword ix
  • Introduction xi
  • 1: Australia 1
  • 2: Canada 13
  • 3: England and Wales 25
  • 4: Germany 39
  • 5: Italy 55
  • 6: Jamaica 69
  • 7: Japan 83
  • 8: Russia 97
  • 9: Slovenia 111
  • 10: South Africa 125
  • 11: Spain 143
  • 12: Thailand 155
  • 13: United States 169
  • Index 185
  • About the Editors and Contributors 195
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 202

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.