Domestic Violence: A Global View

By Randal W. Summers; Allan M. Hoffman | Go to book overview

11
SPAIN

Javier García-Perales

He who becomes a beast is saved the effort of living as a man.

Samuel Johnson


PERCEPTIONS OF DOMESTIC VIOLENCE IN SPAIN

In Spain, the first Congress of Family Organizations1 defines domestic violenceas “all action or omission of one or several family members that cause tensions, humiliation, or other similar situations against other members of the same.” According to Dr. Echeburúa,2 domestic violence is “the physical, psychological, sexual, or any other type of aggression, repeatedly carried out by a relative and which causes physical and/or psychological damage, injuring the freedom of another relative.”

In Spain it was not until the reform of Penal Code 19893 that family violence was considered a crime.4 Family violence can encompass four types of relationships within the same family: against a spouse (wife or husband), against parents, against children, and children against parents.


Historical Perspective

In Spain (and, it can be asserted, in Europe as well), in the period of Roman law (189 B.C.–A.D. 411), the family was a set of persons subordinate to the jurisdiction of the paterfamilias (“family father”), who had unlimited and full power over all family members. This power covered the following rights:5

-143-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Domestic Violence: A Global View
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Contents viii
  • Series Foreword ix
  • Introduction xi
  • 1: Australia 1
  • 2: Canada 13
  • 3: England and Wales 25
  • 4: Germany 39
  • 5: Italy 55
  • 6: Jamaica 69
  • 7: Japan 83
  • 8: Russia 97
  • 9: Slovenia 111
  • 10: South Africa 125
  • 11: Spain 143
  • 12: Thailand 155
  • 13: United States 169
  • Index 185
  • About the Editors and Contributors 195
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 202

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.