Science Fiction, Canonization, Marginalization, and the Academy

By Gary Wastfahl; George Slusser | Go to book overview

Chapter 8
Science Fiction Eye
and the Rebellion against Recursion

Stephen P. Brown

As I seem to have been born with an anarchic streak, I am uncomfortable confronting the topic of authority in sf, specifically as to whether or not I have become one myself. However, due to the relative longevity of Science Fiction Eye and its prominence in the field, the role of authority seems to have de facto settled over me. Ultimately the true authorities in sf are the readers who vote with their money and decide what will be published and what the real trends are. But economic democracy has created a field dominated by movie and TV novelizations and interminable cookie cutter fantasy series. The function of critics is to alert the bored reader to wider possibilities and try to counteract aesthetically destructive trends.

Most people who grow up reading sf with the kind of fervent passion that I did tended to lose interest, as I did, by their late teens. We moved on to more challenging forms of entertainment. After a while, it might occur to sf readers in their mid-twenties that it has been eight years since they have read any sf. There is regret and loss, perhaps a realization that almost nothing in the adult world can give the same kind of excitement, the lurid intellectual extravaganza, the repeated awestricken frisson. But few readers follow through on their regret—one may also miss one's three-wheeler, but there are not many 25-year-olds tooling around on a tricycle.

Sometimes, one of us comes back. Perhaps it was a chance encounter with an interesting book, or an interesting person. We begin reading science fiction again. One of the ironies of the genre is that scattered among the juvenilia are a number of genuinely adult works, novels that challenge on a profound level, that utilize the architecture of science fiction because there are some themes that simply cannot be considered otherwise. Of course, finding those books buried in the tide can be difficult.

There are marketing and critical controversies, of course, most notably the tendency to extract a superb sf novel from its genre and label it sui generis. There

-89-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Science Fiction, Canonization, Marginalization, and the Academy
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 182

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.