W.E.B. Du Bois: An Encyclopedia

By Gerald Horne; Mary Young | Go to book overview

Introduction

W.E.B. Du Bois (1868–1963) was a historian, sociologist, novelist, journalist, editor, and political activist. During his long and fertile career, he embraced variously Pan-Africanism, socialism, and communism. In those various guises, he served as a founder and a principal operative of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP). He also was a leader of the Council on African Affairs founded in 1937, which over the next two decades spearheaded the struggle in the United States in favor of decolonization of Africa. In 1961, on the verge of departing the United States for selfimposed exile in Ghana, West Africa, he joined the Communist Party, USA.

Though his life and career involved many permutations, there were also certain fixed verities as well: Among these were an abiding interest in all things African and a fierce opposition of white supremacy. These fundamentals are reflected in his many writings over the years. His book on the African slave trade, a publication of research conducted primarily while he was a graduate student at Harvard, continues to be cited as a major source of evidence on this bestial commerce, which propelled the United States into the front rank of nations. In The Souls of Black Folk he set the tone for the epoch by noting that the problem of this century was the “color line.” He did not limit these words to this nation, nor did he circumscribe this thought by referring solely to “black-white” relations; specifically and pointedly his concept of the “color line” encompassed Asia and Latin America as well.

The Crisis, the journal he edited during his tenure with the NAACP, was wildly successful, attracting tens of thousands of subscribers as it detailed the triumphs and travails of those struggling against the pestilence that was white supremacy. In opening its pages to poets and other creative writers, Du Bois inadvertently served as a principal founder of what came to be known as the “Harlem Renaissance.”

Phylon, a journal he founded at Adanta University, continues to be a leading

-xix-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
W.E.B. Du Bois: An Encyclopedia
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Foreword: The Dissenting Temperament of W.E.B. Du Bois ix
  • Preface xvii
  • Introduction xix
  • Chronology xxv
  • A 1
  • B 23
  • C 37
  • D 49
  • E 67
  • F 79
  • G 83
  • H 93
  • I 107
  • J 111
  • K 119
  • L 121
  • M 129
  • N 141
  • O 151
  • P 157
  • Q 173
  • R 177
  • S 191
  • T 203
  • U 207
  • V 211
  • W 213
  • Selected Bibliography 227
  • Index 241
  • About the Contributors 249
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 254

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.