W.E.B. Du Bois: An Encyclopedia

By Gerald Horne; Mary Young | Go to book overview
Chronology
1868Born Great Barrington, Massachusetts, to Alfred and Mary Du Bois.
1880–1884Attends Great Barrington High School; graduates as class valedictorian. As the valedictorian speaker, the subject of his speech is “Wendell Phillips.”
1885–1888Attends Fisk University, Nashville, Tennessee; teaches in rural school districts during the summer; receives B.A. in 1888.
1888–1890Enters Harvard as a junior; receives B.A., graduating cum laude. He is one of the commencement speakers. His subject: “Jefferson Davis: Representative of Civilization.”
1890–1892Begins graduate work at Harvard.
1892–1894Awarded a fellowship from the Slater Fund after considerable difficulty. Studies at the University of Berlin.
1894–1896Teaches Latin and Greek at Wilberforce University in Ohio. Marries Nina Gomer.
1894Receives Ph.D. from Harvard.
1895His dissertation is published by Harvard University Press— The Suppression of the African Slave Trade.
1896–1897“Assistant instructor” at the University of Pennsylvania.
1897–1910Teaches history and economics at Adanta University. Begins the Atlanta University Studies.
1897–1911Organizes the Adanta University conference for the study of the Negro Problems; editor of the institution's publications.

-xxv-

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W.E.B. Du Bois: An Encyclopedia
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Foreword: The Dissenting Temperament of W.E.B. Du Bois ix
  • Preface xvii
  • Introduction xix
  • Chronology xxv
  • A 1
  • B 23
  • C 37
  • D 49
  • E 67
  • F 79
  • G 83
  • H 93
  • I 107
  • J 111
  • K 119
  • L 121
  • M 129
  • N 141
  • O 151
  • P 157
  • Q 173
  • R 177
  • S 191
  • T 203
  • U 207
  • V 211
  • W 213
  • Selected Bibliography 227
  • Index 241
  • About the Contributors 249
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