W.E.B. Du Bois: An Encyclopedia

By Gerald Horne; Mary Young | Go to book overview

W

WALLING, WILLIAM ENGLISH (1877-1936)

William Walling English, best known for his role in founding the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), was born in Louisville, Kentucky, in 1877 to a wealthy and well-connected family. His great-grandfather was a Democratic candidate for vice president. While attending Harvard Law School, after graduating from the University of Chicago, he retained his southern-bred distaste for being thrown into the company of blacks. After dropping out of law school he spent several years becoming a radical journalist and social reformer. Although he was never able to completely free himself from the racial culture in which he had been reared, he recognized it, isolated it, and acted in spite of it. When in 1908 the European American citizens of Abraham Lincoln's former home of Springfield, Illinois, went on a rampage against their African American neighbors, Walling and his socially conscious wife, Anna Strunsky Walling, were soon on the scene to investigate.

Walling's celebrated article on the riot in The Independent. (September 3, 1908), “Race War in the North,” touched off a series of events leading to the founding of the NAACP by Walling, Mary White Ovington, Henry Moskowitz, Charles Edward Russell, and Oswald Garrison Villard, all prominent European American socialists or liberals. It was, of course, the existence of Du Bois' predominantly black Niagara Movement that helped pave the way for the new civil rights organization. After the group's founding in 1910, Walling was largely responsible for arranging for Du Bois to move to New York and become publicity director and editor of The Crisis. Without Du Bois and the bulk of the Niagara Movement, the NAACP might have been condemned to remain primarily an organization of white social reformers, instead of gradually being able to achieve a depth of support within the black community. Walling

-213-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
W.E.B. Du Bois: An Encyclopedia
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Foreword: The Dissenting Temperament of W.E.B. Du Bois ix
  • Preface xvii
  • Introduction xix
  • Chronology xxv
  • A 1
  • B 23
  • C 37
  • D 49
  • E 67
  • F 79
  • G 83
  • H 93
  • I 107
  • J 111
  • K 119
  • L 121
  • M 129
  • N 141
  • O 151
  • P 157
  • Q 173
  • R 177
  • S 191
  • T 203
  • U 207
  • V 211
  • W 213
  • Selected Bibliography 227
  • Index 241
  • About the Contributors 249
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 254

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.