INTRODUCTION

Interest in the British cinema has never been stronger. Unlike earlier periods, it is no longer confined to a small number of prestigious directors, such as Alfred Hitchcock,* or genres, notably Hammer Studios and the horror film. Today, it is wide-ranging. This was confirmed recently when Manchester University Press announced the directors chosen for a new series of books. The first director was Lance Comfort,* followed by Jack Clayton* and J. Lee Thompson.* Clayton, possibly, but Comfort and Lee Thompson! Why not David Lean,* Carol Reed,* or another book on Hitchcock? The decision to begin with a director who rarely, except for a brief period in the 1940s, worked with major stars in A-level films is symptomatic of a shift or a broadening of parameters. While this change did not take place overnight, it gathered strength throughout the 1990s until we now have reached a stage where one of Comfort's best films, Great Day* (1945), a strange mixture of melodrama and film noir within a rural wartime setting, can be discussed with the same rigour and intensity as more prestigious films from the same period, such as Brief Encounter (1945).*

The British film industry, as opposed to studies of the British cinema, is much more fragile. This has been the case of most of the twentieth century. Despite periodic claims of a “renaissance” and revival, and despite occasional films that enjoy worldwide fame and fortune, the film industry is as insecure as ever. In 1933, Alexander Korda's* production of The Private Life of Henry VIII* had its world premiere at Radio City Music Hall in New York and grossed, on first release, more than half a million pounds. This precipitated a boom in film production and the construction of Korda's studio at Denham. By 1938, the boom was well and truly over and Korda had lost control of his studio. Sixty years after The Private Life of Henry VIII, Four Weddings and a Funeral* (1994) earned more than $250 million, followed three years later by the worldwide success of The Full Monty. * Yet, the U.S. cinema has strengthened its hold on the British

-xi-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Guide to British Cinema
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Series Foreword vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction xi
  • A 1
  • B 16
  • C 47
  • D 90
  • E 120
  • F 126
  • G 144
  • H 173
  • I 200
  • J 213
  • K 218
  • L 226
  • M 256
  • N 278
  • O 291
  • P 299
  • Q 311
  • R 313
  • S 331
  • T 353
  • U 373
  • V 375
  • W 378
  • Z 398
  • Appendix: List of Films, Actors, and Directors, 1929-2000 401
  • Selected Bibliography 405
  • Index 411
  • About the Author 441
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 444

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.