Student's Guide to Landmark Congressional Laws on Civil Rights

By Marcus D. Pohlmann; Linda Vallar Whisenhunt | Go to book overview

STUDENT'S GUIDE TO
LANDMARK
CONGRESSIONAL LAWS
ON CIVIL RIGHTS

MARCUS D. POHLMANN
and LINDA VALLAR WHISENHUNT

STUDENT'S GUIDE TO
LANDMARK CONGRESSIONAL LAWS
John R. Vile, Series Adviser

Greenwood Press

Westport, Connecticut • London

-iii-

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Student's Guide to Landmark Congressional Laws on Civil Rights
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Series Foreword xi
  • Acknowledgments xv
  • Introduction xvii
  • I - The Slavery Period 1
  • 1: Articles of Confederation 1776 3
  • 2: Declaration of Independence 1776 8
  • 3: Northwest Ordinance 1787 13
  • 4: United States Constitution 1787 16
  • 5: Fugitive Slave Act 1793 22
  • 6: Slave Importation Act 1807 27
  • 7: Missouri Compromise 1820 35
  • 8: Compromise of 1850 1850 40
  • 9: Kansas-Nebraska Act 1854 46
  • 10: Constitution of the Confederate States of America 1861 52
  • 11: Confiscation Acts 1861 and 1862 56
  • 12: Emancipation Proclamation 1863 62
  • II - Postwar Reconstruction 69
  • 13: Freedmen's Bureau 1865 71
  • 14: Thirteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution 1865 78
  • 15: Civil Rights Act 1866 82
  • 16: Reconstruction Act 1867 85
  • 17: Fourteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution 1868 92
  • 18: Fifteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution 1870 102
  • 19: Enforcement Act 1870 106
  • 20: Klan Act 1871 115
  • 21: Civil Rights Act 1875 123
  • III - Civil Rights Era 129
  • 22: Executive Order 8802 1941 133
  • 23: Executive Order 9808 1946 139
  • 24: Executive Order 9980 1948 145
  • 25: Executive Order 9981 1948 152
  • 26: Executive Order 10730 1957 157
  • 27: Civil Rights Act 1957 163
  • 28: Civil Rights Act 1960 173
  • 29: Executive Order 10925 1961 183
  • 30: Executive Order 11053 1962 194
  • 31: Executive Order 11063 1962 199
  • 32: Twenty-Fourth Amendment to the United States Constitution 1964 207
  • 33: Civil Rights Act 1964 210
  • 34: Voting Rights Act 1965 235
  • 35: Executive Order 1124 1965 250
  • 36: Fair Housing Act 1968 261
  • Bibliography 275
  • Index 277
  • About the Authors 285
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