U.S. Marine Corps World War II Order of Battle: Ground and Air Units in the Pacific War, 1939-1945

By Gordon L. Rottman | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

Living in a remote portion of southwest Louisiana offers its own challenges to conducting serious research. Without the help of various libraries this would have been a most difficult task. The Beauregard Parish Library in DeRidder probably obtained more (obscure) books through interlibrary loan for me than for any other person in the parish. The Vernon Parish Library in Leesville allowed me the use of the only microfilm reader with a copy capability in the area, plus gave me a break on the reproduction price. Stephanie R. Jones and Freeman Shell Jr. of the Allen Library on Fort Polk provided invaluable assistance in many research matters. The excellent military, history, and government collections of the Fondern Library at Rice University in Houston, Texas, was of immeasurable value.

As always, close friends with similar or related interests provide some of the most valuable information and ideas. My longtime friend Paul Lemmer provided a seemingly endless pool of trivia and ideas. Ken Atkins (now deceased) always provided good ideas. David Bingham, curator of the Ft. Polk Military Museum, opened his personal book collection and the museum's book collections to me. George Grammas, a fellow worker and good friend, provided his expert grammatical advice while inflicting minimal humiliation. Charles D. Melson (Maj, USMC, Ret) provided excellent information, advice, and encouragement. His own writing efforts have always been inspiring. George Nafziger of The Nafziger Collection was a source of task organization information and is sincerely thanked for his enthusiasm. My neighbors, friends, and coworkers, Leroy “Red” Wilson and Roger Hoyt, were invaluable with their computer assistance and advice. A special thanks goes to Steve Sherman of RADIX Press, Houston, for his advice, encouragement, and loan of a portable copier so necessary when conducting research in Washington, DC. The author is especially appreciative of the longtime mentorship of Shelby Stanton, the master of modern order-of-battle studies.

Special thanks go to Evyln Englander, Marine Corps Historical Branch Library, Washington Navy Yard, DC, for guiding me through the library; Kathy Eaton,

-xiii-

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U.S. Marine Corps World War II Order of Battle: Ground and Air Units in the Pacific War, 1939-1945
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Foreword ix
  • Preface xi
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • 1: U.S. Marine Corps Organizational Profile 1
  • 2: U.S. Marine Corps Shore Establishment 41
  • 3: Fleet Marine Force 77
  • 4: Amphibious Corps and Forces; Marine Divisions, Brigades, and Tactical Groups 100
  • 5: Fleet Marine Force Ground Units 158
  • 6: Fleet Marine Force Ground Unit Operations 261
  • 7: Marine Corps Aviation Profile 383
  • 8: Marine Corps Aviation Units 417
  • 9: Fleet Marine Force Aviation Unit Campaign Participation 456
  • Appendixes 511
  • Notes on Sources 581
  • Selected Bibliography 583
  • Index 589
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