Skills of Workplace Communication: A Handbook for TandD Specialists and Their Organizations

By Richard P. Picardi | Go to book overview

12
Writing and Revising
Neutral and Good News
Memos

CREATING FRONTLOADED INFORMATION AND
PROCEDURE MEMOS

The single greatest purpose of business memo writing is to provide information and explain procedures. Like all memos they are sent through three channels: hard copy, fax, and e-mail. These are almost always internal, vertical communications sent down from upper management to lower-level employees or up from employees to management.

When we write such memos we want to get right to the point. This is why they are frontloaded or direct in organization and expression. However, they should not be abrupt or condescending in any way. Like all successful business communication they should always be courteous and positive in tone.

Information and procedure memos, like all expository writing, have three parts: introduction, development, and conclusion. Since they are frontloaded, information and procedure memos place the central idea up front in the introduction.

-127-

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