The Politics of Trafficking: The First International Movement to Combat the Sexual Exploitation of Women

By Stephanie A. Limoncelli | Go to book overview

Notes

Chapter 1

1. The first speaker, Percy Bunting, addressed the 1899 International Congress on the White Slave Trade in London. See National Vigilance Association, The White Slave Trade: Transactions of the International Congress on the White Slave Trade (London: National Vigilance Association, 1899), 66–67, GL FAI Brochures, 300(6), 343.545.NVA(758). The second speaker, Henry J. Wilson, a member of Parliament in Great Britain, was associated with the International Abolitionist Federation. See National Vigilance Association, “White Slave Traffic: International Congress Under the Auspices of the National Vigilance Association Held at the Westminster Palace Hotel on Wednesday June 21, Thursday 22nd, Friday 23rd, 1899,” The Vigilance Record, 1899 (July):6–7, WL.

2. I use the term globalization to refer to the worldwide expansion of material and symbolic infrastructures that increase global connectedness. This expansion entails the transformation of social relations and power. The nineteenth century experienced a massive wave of globalization, generally understood to have continued until 1914. See, for example, Held and McGrew 2000 for an overview of contemporary debates about globalization.

3. See, for example, Offen 2000 and Rupp 1997 on the history of European and international feminisms and their efforts on these issues.

4. In using the term sexuality, I am referring to socially constructed meanings, expectations, practices, and identities pertaining to sex.

5. Kligman 1998; Mosse 1985; Stoler 1997b; Yuval-Davis 1998.

6. Clancy-Smith and Gouda 1998; Gal and Kligman 2000; Nagel 2003; Stoler 1989; Yuval-Davis 1998.

7. Nagel 1998:255–256.

-157-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Politics of Trafficking: The First International Movement to Combat the Sexual Exploitation of Women
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 218

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.