Terrorism and Public Health: A Balanced Approach to Strengthening Systems and Protecting People

By Barry S. Levy; Victor W. Sidel | Go to book overview

8
Responding to the public
health crisis in Afghanistan

PETER SALAMA, JENNIFER LEANING, AND ANNALIES BORREL

The Al Qaeda organization, which carried out the September 11 terrorist attacks, was based in Afghanistan and closely associated with the Taliban government there, which had ravaged the Afghan people, violated their human rights, and further worsened their health and quality of life—already seriously damaged by decades of war and civil strife. In response to the terrorist attacks of September 11, the U. S. military, allies, and in-country opposition forces brought down the Taliban government in October 2001. The new political situation has led to increased opportunities to respond to the public health crisis in Afghanistan. This chapter describes that crisis and the response to it.


BACKGROUND

Afghanistan is a landlocked country of 652,225 square kilometers—slightly smaller than Texas—that shares its borders with Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan, and Tajikistan to the north, China to the northeast, Pakistan to the east, and Iran to the west. Rugged mountainous terrain, large deserts, limited arable land, and a shortage of water characterize its geography. Climactic conditions are extreme, with hot, dry summers and harsh winters, which furnish the snow that feeds its five major river systems, providing water for irrigation.

-136-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Terrorism and Public Health: A Balanced Approach to Strengthening Systems and Protecting People
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 377

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.