Please update your browser

You're using a version of Internet Explorer that isn't supported by Questia.
To get a better experience, go to one of these sites and get the latest
version of your preferred browser:

Mercy, Mercy Me: African-American Culture and the American Sixties

By James C. Hall | Go to book overview

EPILOGUE
WHAT 'S GOING ON (?)

“THE MOST TRULY MODERN OF ALL PEOPLES”

The Blacks of the Americas now face a historic choice. To survive,
they must abandon their search for a past, must indeed recognize
that they lack all claims to a distinctive cultural heritage, and that
the path ahead lies not in myth making and in historical recon-
struction, which are always doomed to failure, but in accepting the
epic challenge of their reality. Black Americans can be the first
group in the history of mankind who transcend the confines and
grip of a cultural heritage, and in so doing, they can become the
most truly modern of all peoples—a people who feel no need for a
nation, a past, or a particularistic culture, but whose style of life will
be a rational and continually changing adaptation to the exigencies
of survival, at the highest possible level of existence.

ORLANDO PATTERSON (1972)1

On theoretical as well as empirical grounds, the dialectical concept
pronounces its own hopelessness. The human reality is its history
and, in it, contradictions do not explode by themselves. The conflict
between streamlined, rewarding domination on the one hand, and
its achievements that make for self-determination and pacification
on the other, may become blatant beyond any possible denial, but it
may well continue to be a manageable and even productive conflict,
for with the growth in the technological conquest of nature grows
the conquest of man by man. And this conquest reduces the free-
dom which is the necessary a priori of liberation. This is freedom of
thought in the only sense in which thought can be free in the ad-
ministered world—as the consciousness of its repressive productiv-
ity, and as the absolute need for breaking out of this whole. But pre-
cisely this absolute need does not prevail where it could become the
driving force of a historical practice, the effective cause of qualita-
tive change. Without this material force, even the most acute con-
sciousness remains powerless.

HERBERT MARCUSE, One-Dimensional Man (1964)2

-225-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Mercy, Mercy Me: African-American Culture and the American Sixties
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 283

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.