4
Heloise and Discussion
about Love

By late 1115, a major upheaval was beginning to shake Abelard's academic career. Having established himself as an authority on dialectical argument, he became obsessed with Heloise, whom he saw as living out philosophical principles in a way that he could only admire. At her instigation, they started to talk about the ethics of true friendship. In the process, he found himself abandoning traditional ideals of sexual purity to gratify his desire. In the Historia calamitatum, Abelard presents the story of his early relationship with Heloise and its dramatic conclusion as one of the catastrophes that changed the direction of his life but ultimately served a greater good. The story of their early liaison generated rumors that Abelard was still trying to quell in the early 1130s. We get some idea of the hostility Abelard's behavior generated from comments made by Roscelin of Compiègne in a letter written only a few years after the events it describes:

I have seen indeed in Paris that a certain cleric called Fulbert welcomed
you as a guest into his house, fed you as a close friend and member of the
household, and also entrusted to you his niece, a very prudent young
woman of outstanding disposition, for tuition. You, however, were not so
much unmindful as contemptuous of that man, a noble and a cleric, a
canon even of the church of Paris, your host and lord, who looked after
you freely and honorably. Not sparing the virgin entrusted to you whom
you should have taught as a student and whipped up by a spirit of unre-
strained debauchery, you taught her not to argue but to fornicate. In one

-58-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Abelard and Heloise
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Great Medieval Thinkers ii
  • Abelard and Heloise iii
  • Series Foreword v
  • Contents xi
  • Abbreviations xiii
  • Introduction 3
  • 1: Images of Abelard and Heloise 7
  • 2: The Early Years Roscelin of Compiègne and William of Champeaux 21
  • 3: Challenging Tradition the Dialectica 43
  • 4: Heloise and Discussion About Love 58
  • 5: Returning to Logica 81
  • 6: The Trinity 101
  • 7: A Christian Theologia 123
  • 8: Heloise and the Paraclete 145
  • 9: Ethics, Sin, and Redemption 174
  • 10: Faith, Sacraments, and Charity 204
  • 11: Accusations of Heresy 226
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 308

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.