Psychometric Testing: 1000 Ways to Assess Your Personality, Creativity, Intelligence and Lateral Thinking

By Philip Carter; Ken Russell | Go to book overview

Creativity

The term creativity refers to mental processes that lead to solutions, ideas, concepts, artistic forms, theories or products that are unique and novel.

The creative functions are controlled by the right-hand hemisphere of the human brain. This is the side of the brain which is under-used by the majority of people, as opposed to the thought processes of the left-hand hemisphere, which is characterised by order, sequence and logic, and is responsible for such functions as numerical and verbal skills.

Because it is under-used, much creative talent in many people remains untapped throughout life. Until we try, most of us never know what we can actually achieve. We know that we all have a creative side to our brain, therefore we all have the potential to be creative. However, because of the pressures of modern living and the need for specialisation, many of us never have the time or opportunity, or indeed are given the encouragement, to explore our latent talents, even though most of us have sufficient ammunition to realise this potential in the form of data which has been fed into, collated and processed by the brain over many years.

Because it is such a diverse subject, and because in so many people it is to a great extent unexplored, creativity is very difficult to measure.

The following three different types of exercises are all designed with the object of improving or recognising your

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