Blood and Justice: The Seventeenth-Century Parisian Doctor Who Made Blood Transfusion History

By Pete Moore | Go to book overview

Acknowledgements

As far as I can see, no book written by a single person without the help of others would be worth reading. I'm therefore pleased to acknowledge that I did not write this book alone, and that I am extremely grateful to those who helped me out along the way. The historical scholars A. Rupert Hall and Marie Boas Hall gave me a much needed injection of enthusiasm halfway through the writing, as well as lending me the wealth of their historic know-how, and Professor Michael Hunter pointed me towards some great leads at the beginning of the project as well as commenting on some of the script. In addition, consultant haematologist Dr John Amess helped tidy-up my understanding of the science of blood transfusion reactions.

Researching the material for this book involved working in a number of archive libraries, and I would particularly like to thank the staff in the Royal Society library for their friendly assistance in finding ancient documents. Finally, my prime reader Ade'le, agent Mandy Little, commissioning editor Sally Smith, copy-editor Caroline Ellerby, production editor Amie Jackowski Tibble and picture-researcher Benjamin Earl all worked hard to give you, the reader, a book that is worth picking up and not putting down until it is finished. Thank you.

-ix-

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Blood and Justice: The Seventeenth-Century Parisian Doctor Who Made Blood Transfusion History
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Plates vii
  • Note on Sources viii
  • Acknowledgements ix
  • 'Cast', and People Mentioned,In Order of Appearance x
  • Chapter One - A Vital Fluid 1
  • Chapter Two - Building on Harvey 17
  • Chapter Three - English Infusion 36
  • Chapter Four - Scientific Society 53
  • Chapter Five - English Transfusions 67
  • Chapter Six - Denis 'Route to the Top 91
  • Chapter Seven - Precedence and Prison 108
  • Chapter Eight - Playing Catch-Up 132
  • Chapter Nine - Mauroy Mystery 149
  • Chapter Ten - The Great Debate 161
  • Chapter Eleven - Mistake, Malice or Murder? 194
  • Notes 211
  • Timeline 214
  • Bibliography 219
  • Further Reading 224
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