The Trauma of Sexual Assault: Treatment, Prevention, and Practice

By Jenny Petrak; Barbara Hedge | Go to book overview

Chapter 14
THE FUTURE AGENDA FOR CARE
AND RESEARCH

Jenny Petrak


INTRODUCTION

The consequences of sexual assault have a major impact on health and economic resources across the globe. The World Health Organization estimate that in industrialized countries rape and domestic violence account for 1 in every 5 healthy years of life lost to women aged 15–14 (Heise, Pitanguy, and Germain, 1994). Byrne, Resnick, Kilpatrick, Best, and Saunders (1999), using a broad definition of 'victimization' which included physical and sexual assault, found that these crimes significantly increase women's risk for socio-economic decline (e.g., unemployment, divorce, poverty). It therefore continues to be somewhat surprising that care, treatment, research, and prevention of violence against women and men does not appear to be high on the political agenda of the majority of countries, industrialized or otherwise. As we start the new millennium, many anti-rape programmes and community-based rape crisis organizations are experiencing dwindling resources and are struggling to survive. Social commentators emphasize the extent to which rape and sexual assault are ingrained within our social order and, perhaps, this contributes to a sense of inevitability regarding these crimes. However, only a few decades have passed since feminist activists called for the elimination of these crimes or at least'… a 24 hour truce during which there is no rape' (Dworkin, 1983). While essential statements set a tone for reform and incentive to action, it is likely that much more time, political action, and sustained reform is required to achieve such radical social and cultural change. Much has been learnt, however, over the past decades and translated into legal, medical, social reform, and clinical practice. Rape

-331-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Trauma of Sexual Assault: Treatment, Prevention, and Practice
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 352

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.